Category Archives: Food

I hope there is Vínarterta

Many Large ‘Amma’ Vínarterta were delivered to Vancouver for a very special event; the Icelandic National League of North America INLofNA Convention. At breakfast on the first morning I heard someone say longingly: “I hope there is Vinarterta.” I realize some people probably know more than I do about Vinarterta, and the power of it […]

Seven Layered Vínarterta (Not Six)

“How then are we to relate to our ancestors? How are we to feel ourselves in some meaningful way Icelandic and in a direct line of descent of Icelandic values and an Icelandic way of life? Well, for Western Icelanders here in North America the answer is a practical and pragmatic one. We use food. […]

No Mitten-Grabbing!

Icelandic Saying: “Now there won’t do any mitten-takes” =  “Nú duga engin vettlingatök.” (Meaning: Now we are going to do it properly.) No mitten-grabbing! If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing well! (I hear Amma!) With this level of translation required, no wonder it’s hard to learn Icelandic. And yet, when you think about it, […]

My cake is dough

“My cake is dough.” – William Shakespeare. It’s an English proverb meaning ‘My plans have failed.’ And it’s from Shakespeare’s play ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ in Act 5, Scene 1 it goes like this: Gremio: ‘My cake is dough, but I’ll in among the rest. Out of hope of all but my share of […]

Gaman Saman! Fun Together! Thorrablot 2016

Gaman Saman ‘Fun Together’ Thorrablot 2016: A Visual, Cultural and Culinary Feast! FRIDAY, APRIL 8th REVIVAL – 783 College St, Toronto. 6:30pm Appetizers and Cash Bar 7:30 Feast! Spirited tributes to Icelandic art, poetry, storytelling, singing, and musical performances in our dazzling new venue. Traditional Icelandic food creations from Chef Arden Jackson! Iceland’s Ambassador Sturla […]

What is Thorrablot? Þorrablót?

What is Thorrablot? It was a sacrificial midwinter festival offered to the gods in pagan Iceland of the past. It was abolished during the Christianization of Iceland, but resurrected in the 19th century as a midwinter celebration that continues to be celebrated to this day. The timing for the festival coincides with the month of Thorri, according […]