Tag Archives: Rúllupylsa

Vinarterta. Live and Let Live.

Vinarterta. You used to say Live and Let Live. (You know you did. You know you did. You know you did.) Was life easier when you were young and your heart was an open book? And now in this ever-changing world do you yearn for time to stand still, or slow down for just a […]

Seven Different Kinds of Weather

‘There are seven different kinds of weather on one autumn night.’ Says an Icelandic Saying. I’m feeling the cold rain under the grey sky and longing to stay in for a warm gathering of friends and coffee. I’m even game for celebrating with another Thanksgiving feast. Do you feel that way? I’m imagining you visiting […]

Let us Eat!

‘Let Us Eat!’ Says everyone as the table is set with favourite Holiday Fare. As the cool weather sets in, we have a natural tendency to harvest and prepare for winter. With our identities wrapped around food culture, we fall into a conversation around plans for holiday gatherings. With the first frost particular cultural cravings […]

Where are the Icelanders? Show us some Icelanders!

“Where are the Icelanders? Show us some Icelanders.” When the first Vínarterta-recipe-carrying Icelandic migrants arrived to settle in Canada in the 1870’s they were met with questions and assumptions about who they were! “Even as the first migrants arrived in Manitoba, curious residents flocked to the docks demanding a display based on their own understanding […]

Gaman Saman! Fun Together! Thorrablot 2016

Gaman Saman ‘Fun Together’ Thorrablot 2016: A Visual, Cultural and Culinary Feast! FRIDAY, APRIL 8th REVIVAL – 783 College St, Toronto. 6:30pm Appetizers and Cash Bar 7:30 Feast! Spirited tributes to Icelandic art, poetry, storytelling, singing, and musical performances in our dazzling new venue. Traditional Icelandic food creations from Chef Arden Jackson! Iceland’s Ambassador Sturla […]

What is Thorrablot? Þorrablót?

What is Thorrablot? It was a sacrificial midwinter festival offered to the gods in pagan Iceland of the past. It was abolished during the Christianization of Iceland, but resurrected in the 19th century as a midwinter celebration that continues to be celebrated to this day. The timing for the festival coincides with the month of Thorri, according […]